Difference between revisions of "IPv6"

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(Added where to get more information, how to determine and ping a IPv6 address)
 
(Ping a IPv6 Address)
 
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In the above example, the '''IPv6''' address is: "''fe80::20c:29ff:fec9:d51a''". The double colons (::) in the address represent 3 groupings of zeros. Hence, "''fe80::20c:29ff:fec9:d51a''" is the short hand equivalent of: "''fe80:0:0:0:20c:29ff:fec9:d51a''".
 
In the above example, the '''IPv6''' address is: "''fe80::20c:29ff:fec9:d51a''". The double colons (::) in the address represent 3 groupings of zeros. Hence, "''fe80::20c:29ff:fec9:d51a''" is the short hand equivalent of: "''fe80:0:0:0:20c:29ff:fec9:d51a''".
  
== Ping a IPv6 Address ==
+
== Ping an IPv6 Address (scope link) ==
  
The following demonstrates how one can ''ping'' a '''IPv6''' address:
+
The following demonstrates how one can ''ping'' a '''IPv6''' address that has a limited ''link'' scope:
  
 
<div class="screen">
 
<div class="screen">
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3 packets transmitted, 3 received, 0% packet loss, time 2000ms
 
3 packets transmitted, 3 received, 0% packet loss, time 2000ms
 
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.349/0.548/0.935/0.274 ms
 
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.349/0.548/0.935/0.274 ms
 +
</pre><div class="userInput"><span class="prompt">[root@taco ~]# </span></div>
 +
</div>
 +
 +
== Ping an IPv6 Address (scope global) ==
 +
 +
When a '''IPv6''' address is ''global'' in scope, it indicates that you will ''not'' need to specify the NIC when running commands. The following demonstrates how one can ''ping'' a '''IPv6''' address that has a ''global'' scope:
 +
 +
<div class="screen">
 +
  <div class="screenTitle">Using '''ping6''' to ''ping'' a '''IPv6''' Address</div>
 +
  <div class="userInput"><span class="prompt">[root@taco ~]# </span>ping6 -c 3 2001:db8:1:0:a00:27ff:feec:97c5</div>
 +
  <pre class="computerOutput">
 +
PING 2001:db8:1:0:a00:27ff:feec:97c5(2001:db8:1:0:a00:27ff:feec:97c5) 56 data bytes
 +
64 bytes from 2001:db8:1:0:a00:27ff:feec:97c5: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=4.12 ms
 +
64 bytes from 2001:db8:1:0:a00:27ff:feec:97c5: icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=205 ms
 +
64 bytes from 2001:db8:1:0:a00:27ff:feec:97c5: icmp_seq=3 ttl=64 time=1.73 ms
 +
 +
--- 2001:db8:1:0:a00:27ff:feec:97c5 ping statistics ---
 +
3 packets transmitted, 3 received, 0% packet loss, time 2004ms
 +
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 1.731/70.369/205.254/95.383 ms
 +
</pre><div class="userInput"><span class="prompt">[root@taco ~]# </span></div>
 +
</div>
 +
 +
= Router Advertisement Daemon for IPv6 ('''radvd''') =
 +
 +
If you are on a network that has not been set up for '''IPv6''' support, it is likely that  you will only find '''IPv6''' addresses which are limited in scope to: ''link''.
 +
 +
<div class="screen">
 +
  <div class="screenTitle">Listing '''IPv6''' Address Before '''radvd'''</div>
 +
  <div class="userInput"><span class="prompt">[root@taco ~]# </span>ip -6 addr show p2p1</div>
 +
  <pre class="computerOutput">
 +
2: p2p1: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qlen 1000
 +
    inet6 fe80::a00:27ff:feec:97c5/64 scope link
 +
      valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
 +
</pre><div class="userInput"><span class="prompt">[root@taco ~]# </span></div>
 +
</div>
 +
 +
It is difficult to work with '''IPv6''' addresses with a scope of: ''link''. To use these addresses you will need to specify the NIC along with the '''IPv6''' address when running commands (and not all commands support the option of specifying a interface).
 +
 +
One easy method to assign global dynamic '''IPv6''' addresses to the machines on your network is to start the '''radvd''' service on your NST system:
 +
 +
<div class="screen">
 +
  <div class="screenTitle">Starting '''radvd''' Service</div>
 +
  <div class="userInput"><span class="prompt">[root@taco ~]# </span>systemctl start radvd</div>
 +
  <pre class="computerOutput">
 +
</pre><div class="userInput"><span class="prompt">[root@taco ~]# </span></div>
 +
</div>
 +
 +
Once the '''radvd''' service has been started, all machines on the LAN will likely be assigned one or more dynamic '''IPv6''' addresses global in scope.
 +
 +
<div class="screen">
 +
  <div class="screenTitle">Listing '''IPv6''' Address After '''radvd'''</div>
 +
  <div class="userInput"><span class="prompt">[root@taco ~]# </span>ip -6 addr show p2p1</div>
 +
  <pre class="computerOutput">
 +
2: p2p1: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qlen 1000
 +
    inet6 2002:c0a8:12c:1234:a00:27ff:feec:97c5/128 scope global dynamic
 +
      valid_lft 292sec preferred_lft 292sec
 +
    inet6 2001:db8:1:0:a00:27ff:feec:97c5/128 scope global dynamic
 +
      valid_lft 86392sec preferred_lft 86392sec
 +
    inet6 fe80::a00:27ff:feec:97c5/64 scope link
 +
      valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
 
</pre><div class="userInput"><span class="prompt">[root@taco ~]# </span></div>
 
</pre><div class="userInput"><span class="prompt">[root@taco ~]# </span></div>
 
</div>
 
</div>

Latest revision as of 18:08, 4 February 2014

Resources

Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) resources:

IPv6 - Wikipedia 
Information about IPv6 maintained at the Wikipedia web site.

Usage Notes

Determine IPv6 Address

Use the ifconfig command to show the IPv6 address associated with a particular interface (look for the line labeled: "inet6 addr:").

Using ifconfig to Find the inet6 addr
[root@taco ~]# ifconfig eth0
eth0      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:0C:29:C9:D5:1A  
          inet addr:192.168.0.138  Bcast:192.168.0.255  Mask:255.255.255.0
          inet6 addr: fe80::20c:29ff:fec9:d51a/64 Scope:Link
          UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
          RX packets:1293164 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:1878939 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000 
          RX bytes:151619640 (144.5 MiB)  TX bytes:642030150 (612.2 MiB)
          Interrupt:17 Base address:0x1400 

[root@taco ~]#

In the above example, the IPv6 address is: "fe80::20c:29ff:fec9:d51a". The double colons (::) in the address represent 3 groupings of zeros. Hence, "fe80::20c:29ff:fec9:d51a" is the short hand equivalent of: "fe80:0:0:0:20c:29ff:fec9:d51a".

Ping an IPv6 Address (scope link)

The following demonstrates how one can ping a IPv6 address that has a limited link scope:

Using ping6 to ping a IPv6 Address
[root@taco ~]# ping6 -I eth0 -c 3 fe80::20c:29ff:fec9:d51a
PING fe80::20c:29ff:fec9:d51a(fe80::20c:29ff:fec9:d51a) from fe80::20c:29ff:fec9:d51a eth0: 56 data bytes
64 bytes from fe80::20c:29ff:fec9:d51a: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.361 ms
64 bytes from fe80::20c:29ff:fec9:d51a: icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=0.935 ms
64 bytes from fe80::20c:29ff:fec9:d51a: icmp_seq=3 ttl=64 time=0.349 ms

--- fe80::20c:29ff:fec9:d51a ping statistics ---
3 packets transmitted, 3 received, 0% packet loss, time 2000ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.349/0.548/0.935/0.274 ms
[root@taco ~]#

Ping an IPv6 Address (scope global)

When a IPv6 address is global in scope, it indicates that you will not need to specify the NIC when running commands. The following demonstrates how one can ping a IPv6 address that has a global scope:

Using ping6 to ping a IPv6 Address
[root@taco ~]# ping6 -c 3 2001:db8:1:0:a00:27ff:feec:97c5
PING 2001:db8:1:0:a00:27ff:feec:97c5(2001:db8:1:0:a00:27ff:feec:97c5) 56 data bytes
64 bytes from 2001:db8:1:0:a00:27ff:feec:97c5: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=4.12 ms
64 bytes from 2001:db8:1:0:a00:27ff:feec:97c5: icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=205 ms
64 bytes from 2001:db8:1:0:a00:27ff:feec:97c5: icmp_seq=3 ttl=64 time=1.73 ms

--- 2001:db8:1:0:a00:27ff:feec:97c5 ping statistics ---
3 packets transmitted, 3 received, 0% packet loss, time 2004ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 1.731/70.369/205.254/95.383 ms
[root@taco ~]#

Router Advertisement Daemon for IPv6 (radvd)

If you are on a network that has not been set up for IPv6 support, it is likely that you will only find IPv6 addresses which are limited in scope to: link.

Listing IPv6 Address Before radvd
[root@taco ~]# ip -6 addr show p2p1
2: p2p1: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qlen 1000
    inet6 fe80::a00:27ff:feec:97c5/64 scope link 
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
[root@taco ~]#

It is difficult to work with IPv6 addresses with a scope of: link. To use these addresses you will need to specify the NIC along with the IPv6 address when running commands (and not all commands support the option of specifying a interface).

One easy method to assign global dynamic IPv6 addresses to the machines on your network is to start the radvd service on your NST system:

Starting radvd Service
[root@taco ~]# systemctl start radvd
[root@taco ~]#

Once the radvd service has been started, all machines on the LAN will likely be assigned one or more dynamic IPv6 addresses global in scope.

Listing IPv6 Address After radvd
[root@taco ~]# ip -6 addr show p2p1
2: p2p1: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qlen 1000
    inet6 2002:c0a8:12c:1234:a00:27ff:feec:97c5/128 scope global dynamic 
       valid_lft 292sec preferred_lft 292sec
    inet6 2001:db8:1:0:a00:27ff:feec:97c5/128 scope global dynamic 
       valid_lft 86392sec preferred_lft 86392sec
    inet6 fe80::a00:27ff:feec:97c5/64 scope link 
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
[root@taco ~]#